Mini facelift

What is a Mini Facelift?

The Mini Facelift is a cosmetic procedure that aims to restore the youthful appearance of the face by lifting soft tissues to reshape sagging skin. It is a shorter and cheaper procedure than a regular facelift and can be performed under local anaesthetic.

Mini Facelift surgery targets the effects of ageing to improve the appearance of the lower face and jowels while minimising risk and downtime. The idea is to achieve a rejuvenated, natural look, whilst maintaining what makes you you. The ideal result can boost self-esteem and give you your confidence back.

Am I the right candidate for a Mini Facelift?

The Mini Facelift is a technique best suited to patients who are starting to develop some mild jowling or have had previous lifting procedures. If you are worried about the affects of ageing on your face and are starting to experience mild skin laxity, cheek sagging or loosening of the jawline then Mini Facelift could be the procedure for you.

How does a Mini Facelift work?

In the operation, a cut is made in front of and behind the ear. Any old scars from previous surgery are removed. The skin is lifted off the deeper layers of the face to allow access to a layer called the SMAS. This deeper layer is then tightened, by stitching it over the cheekbone and up behind the ear. The cheek skin is then tightened backwards. The skin does need to be tailored out behind the ear, which leaves variable-length scar in the groove behind the ear, but there is no scar into the hairline behind the ear as you would have in a conventional ‘full’ facelift.

Why choose Bristol Plastic Surgery?

We have the highest aesthetic standards and aim for a pleasing, safe and complication-free outcome from our Mini Facelift procedure. A consultation with an empathetic surgeon will provide important personal counselling. Please use the following information in conjunction with that advice.

How much does a Mini Facelift cost?

Mini face lift under local anaesthetic as an outpatient = starting from £3505.00

Whilst we do our utmost to try to achieve the best possible result for you, I am afraid this cannot be guaranteed.

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Before surgery

Before undergoing this type of surgery, it is very important that you do not take Aspirin or rheumatic-type drugs like Brufen or Nurofen for at least a week before the operation. Should you currently be prescribed these drugs by your GP then please check with him/her whether you can stop taking these safely. These medicines alter the clotting of the blood and make bleeding after the operation more likely. Even one tablet can affect the clotting of the blood for up to ten days before an operation. It is also advisable to avoid Gingko Biloba products.

Patients on oral contraception and HRT should ideally stop for six weeks prior to surgery as there is an increased risk of thrombosis and start again six weeks after surgery. During this period alternative forms of contraception are required.

Smokers have a much higher risk of developing complications. It is very important therefore that patients stop smoking and all nicotine replacements for six weeks before and after surgery. Smoking significantly increases the risk of wound infections and breakdown.

Recovery

The bruising will last for about three weeks and you should remain off exercise for at least two weeks after the procedure, and avoid bending or straining for that time as they can cause you to bleed under the skin. The sensation returns to the skin gradually over a period of some months after the operation and this may feel like a tingling sensation as the nerves regrow. It is also very important that you take great care of the face and not expose it to sunlight and massage the scars until soft and supple.

Please remember that the ‘time clock’ does still keep running and you must expect that the face will tend to become lined once again and to sag with time.

Complications

You should not need drains inserted during the operation.

As with any facelifting procedure, there are some potential problems. Problems with bleeding under the skin may need to be dealt with if the skin swells. In this situation, you would be returned to the operating theatre and the blood clot removed under local anaesthetic and the bleeding points stopped. As with any operation, there are risks of infection and poor scarring, though these risks are very small. There is potential for damaging the nerves that supply movement within the face, which may lead to weakness of the forehead, the corner of the mouth, or very occasionally to the smile, but this is very rare and any weakness is usually shortlived from the local anaeshtetic.